Red Wines for White Wine Drinkers

Red Wines For White Wine Drinkers

If you drink wine, chances are you fall into one of two distinct categories — white wine or red wine lovers. A recent national survey showed that the majority prefer red wines. We know — if you’re a white wine drinker, you’re wondering how that’s possible. There are plenty of white wine drinkers who can’t imagine enjoying a glass of dry red. A chilled glass of a fruity white seems so much more refreshing. While it may seem as if these two categories of wine drinkers are forever separated, we believe there are red wines for white wine drinkers.

There are a variety of characteristics that go into the glass of wine you love. Is it light or heavy? Does it taste fruity or bitter? Is the alcohol content high or low? While stereotypes say that whites are light, refreshing, fruity wines and reds are more complex, savory, dry wines — believe it or not, there are plenty of reds that have many of the same characteristics as white wine. If you’re willing to try, you may find a red wine you enjoy.

Let’s say you want to know what all the red wine hype is about — where do you begin? To help you choose red wine, we’ve created a list of some of the most popular reds that have flavor profiles similar to whites. We’re sure that as you read through the details of each of these red wines, you just might be tempted to give them a try.

Rosé

Our very first recommendation is to start with a dry rosé wine — yes, we know this may make some of the wine connoisseurs cringe, but hear us out. This is the perfect way to begin to get your feet wet as a white wine drinker in a search for their red wine match. Here’s why. The winemaking processes for white wine and red wine are different. Once the grapes are harvested and juiced, in red winemaking, the juice is left to soak together with the grape skins, seeds and stems for an extended period, which is a big part of the reason the flavor profile can be so different.

A dry rosé is the perfect way to begin to get your feet wet as a white wine drinker in a search for their red wine match.

In the rosé winemaking process, red grapes are used, but they only soak with the grape skins for a brief amount of time — usually just a few days — hence the pink color, instead of the red. Therefore, it’s the perfect start to get used to red grapes and get a sense of the different flavors that come from this slightly different winemaking process. It can also be served chilled, which is familiar to you as a white wine drinker.

Pinot Noir

Believe it or not, pinot noir grapes and chardonnay grapes are usually grown together — either on the same vineyard or in the same region. Pinot noir is considered to be a softer red, which is more likely to please a white wine drinker. The variety of grapes used to make pinot noir have thinner skin, which is important because the result is wine with low tannin content, which often causes a more bitter taste.

The best pinot noir for a white wine drinker is from the Burgundy region — where the grapes grow in a cooler climate and are more likely to produce wine with savory fruit flavors, like lemon, quince and apple. These flavors should sound familiar, as they are likely to also be a part of your favorite white wine.

As a bonus, this is another red wine you can drink chilled, so you don’t have to worry about adjusting to both the new flavor and the new serving temperature at the same time.

Gamay or Beaujolais

This wine may go by the name of the grapes, gamay wine, or the name of the region in which the grapes are grown, Beaujolais wine. Gamay is a grape variety that has been around since the 1300s, yet somehow, it’s not very well known. That’s mostly because it grows in the same region of Burgundy as the pinot noir grapes. In that region, pinot noir has always overshadowed gamay. But there’s one subregion of Burgundy, called Beaujolais, where the gamay grape has managed to overshadow its popular relative.

At its core, wine made with gamay grapes from the Beaujolais region has a very similar profile to pinot noir.

At its core, wine made with gamay grapes from the Beaujolais region has a very similar profile to pinot noir – light-bodied, low tannin content and fruity, with tart cherry, raspberry and banana flavors. It’s also best served slightly chilled, ideally to about 60 degrees. However, since it’s the lesser known of the two wines, a bottle of gamay is often more affordable than a bottle of pinot noir.

Barbera

While barbera grapes are primarily grown in Northern Italy, the best barbera red wine for white wine drinkers has roots in Australia and right here in the United States. The reason is that the Italian version tends to be more bitter — a taste that will likely scare away the white wine drinkers.

Don’t let the dark shade of red fool you — this light-bodied wine has low tannin levels and higher acidity, both characteristics of white wine. The versions from Australia and the United States — especially California — come with more of the fruity flavors that include red cherries, strawberries and blackberries. That fruitiness pairs perfectly with a chilled temperature of about 60 degrees.

Schiava

There are wines that come from grapes grown in Italy that may be a great fit for a white wine drinker, schiava grapes are one of them. These grapes also go by the name vernatsch, Black Hamburg or trollinger — and the majority of them come from a valley in the Alps known as Alto Adige.

What is it about this type of wine that appeals to white wine drinkers? Its nickname is the cotton candy wine — it comes with aromas of bubblegum, strawberry and lemonhead candy. Pretty much everything about it is light — from the color to the body. There is a complex aspect of this wine, and that’s the naming. In the region of Italy where the majority of schiava grapes grow, there are three official languages — Ladin, German and Italian — which makes naming a little complicated. Depending on the area, you may see schiava wines labeled as edelvernatsch, kleinvernatsch or St. Maddelena/St. Magdalener DOC — all varieties of schiava grapes.

Rather than worrying about the complex labels, we recommend trying a glass of schiava nera or schiava grigia.

Lambrusco

Lambrusco grapes have been around even longer than gamay grapes. While it’s tough to put an exact date on these grapes, many believe they may have roots all the way back to 160 BC. These wines are almost always semi-sparkling, but it’s important to note that not all Lambrusco wines are created equal. As a white wine drinker, you want to focus on the Lambrusco di Sorbara, one of the high-quality varieties. Lambrusco di Sorbara is the lightest of the Lambrusco wines — appearing to have a color that may even be more pink than red.

You’ll find these wines to be light and refreshing, with sweet aromas of orange, cherries, violets and watermelon. The levels of fruit flavors in this particular wine are high. While these aromas are sweet, and the body light and refreshing, you’ll notice it is also a dry wine, with a medium level of tannins.

Zinfandel

If chardonnay is your white wine go to, then zinfandel might be your red wine match.

For the right white wine drinkers, this red wine just might do the trick. While the typical white wine has a light body, there are fuller-bodied whites, like a chardonnay. If chardonnay is your white wine go to, then zinfandel might be your red wine match. The zinfandel grape can be found in over 10 percent of all Californian vineyards. It’s a key part of the California red wine industry. This fuller-bodied red is juicy, round and low on tannins. Serve it chilled — you won’t have to worry about dulling the fruit flavors in this glass.

Merlot

Merlot is the second most popular red grape in America, and it also has a reputation for being an easy-drinking red. It’s a great introduction to red wines for white wine drinkers. Its history lies in being one of the grapes included in the prestigious Bordeaux wine blend in France in the 1700s. When it came to the United States, Americans decided it was worthy of standing alone, making wines using 100% merlot grapes.

These grapes are in the same family as the white grape variety known as sauvignon blanc. If your favorite white is a rich, California sauvignon blanc, a natural red wine fit might be a merlot. While merlot isn’t considered a low tannin red, it is often made in a low tannin style, which is part of the reason you won’t find the bitterness you usually do with a mid-high-tannin wine. The best place to start is with a domestic and affordable merlot.

Malbec

Malbec has the same history as merlot — beginning among the grapes in the Bordeaux wine blend in France. However, instead of venturing outside of France, this variety of grape is particularly susceptible to disease and rot, and so it was tough to grow and tough to keep healthy. It did eventually find a home outside of France in the wine region of Mendoza in Argentina. It stayed there, though, and malbec wine wasn’t discovered by Americans until the early 2000s.

Malbec is known for being easy to drink, and the most affordable versions of malbec — under $20 — are known for being smooth, juicy and fruity.

Those who keep up with the latest wine lists won’t get to know malbec wine there. This is wine that is known for being delicious and affordable, not for its prestige. It’s also known for being easy to drink, and the most affordable versions of malbec — under $20 — are known for being smooth, juicy and fruity. For a white wine drinker, the less time malbec has to age in oak barrels, the better.

Etna Rosso or Frappato

Both of these wines come from grapes grown on Mount Etna on the Italian island of Sicily. While pinot noir and gamay are more well known, wines from this area have become more popular in the United States. Every good wine enthusiast knows that climate and soil have an impact on the taste of wine — and Etna Rosso and frappato are both prime examples of this. Both are made from grapes grown in volcanic soil. The result is a light-bodied red, with acidity comparable to white wine. The fruitiness is present, too, but in the form of strawberry flavors.

Pour yourself a chilled glass of either of these choices as it’s most refreshing served lightly chilled.

Grenache

Grenache — or garnacha, its Spanish name — grapes are one of the most widely planted grapes in the world. You’ll find this variety of grapes in some of the most famous wines, and it’s easy to see why. This wine is known for its berry flavors — specifically strawberries and raspberries — some have even compared its taste to that of a fruit roll-up.

Grenache — or garnacha, its Spanish name — grapes are one of the most widely planted grapes in the world.

The two different names for this type of wine tell the story of its beginnings. The grape was first discovered in the northern region of Spain, known as Aragon. At that time, it was known by its Spanish name but was not yet very popular. As a result of the location, near the border of France, this variety of grape made its way to the Languedoc-Roussillon region of southern France. Here, the French called it grenache, and it became famous shortly after that.

While grenache wines can have more tannins than some of the other light reds we’ve mentioned, if you stick to an affordable version under $20, you shouldn’t have to worry about bitterness. Spanish garnacha or grenache-based blends from Roussillon in France are both great wines to get started.

Red Wines That Taste Like White

When you’re looking for a red wine that tastes like a white, there are several factors to consider. The easiest way to reveal these factors is to simply ask the question, “What is it about red wines that white wine drinkers can’t stand?” If we asked you, we’re sure your answer would be something along the lines of:

  • Red wines are too dry — or too bitter.
  • Red wines are too heavy.
  • Red wines are too alcoholic.

Therefore, you can see why if you’re searching for a red wine you’ll enjoy, you should search for a red wine that has a light body, low tannin content and a fruity flavor. What exactly does all of that mean for those of you who may not be wine connoisseurs? We’ve included some details on each of these, so you know exactly what you’re searching for in a red wine.

Light Body

When you see a comment about the body of the wine, it’s also often referred to as the viscosity or the “mouthfeel.” In other words, how light or heavy does the wine feel in your mouth? If you’re an avid white wine lover, chances are you like a lighter-bodied wine, because whites tend to be light. Body and alcohol content are a pair, so if you prefer a lighter wine, it’s probably less alcoholic. The good news is, not all red wines come with a full body and higher alcohol content. It is possible to find lighter-bodied red wines with an alcohol content comparable to that of white wine — you just have to know where to look for them.

It is possible to find lighter-bodied red wines with an alcohol content comparable to that of white wine — you just have to know where to look for them.

Low Tannin Levels

Tannins are a natural compound found in grape skins, seeds and stems, and they have a naturally bitter flavor. As you may be able to guess, a high level of tannins is more common in red wine, due to the red winemaking process. Yes — the winemaking process for white wines and red wines is different. In the red winemaking process, the wine is exposed to the grape skins, seeds and stems for an extended period. White wine, on the other hand, is made without the grape skins, seeds and stems. Therefore, it has low tannin content and less of that bitter taste.

If you’re a white wine drinker looking for a red wine, look for red wines that come from grapes with fewer tannins. Burgundy, Dolcetto and Barbera, Pinot Noir, Sangiovese, Spanish Rioja, Beaujolais and Tempranillo are good options. You might also consider a wine that was made with limited exposure to the grape skins, seeds and stems, like a rosé.

It’s also important to note whether or not a red wine was aged in oak barrels because oak adds a lot of tannin to the wine throughout the aging process. While these tannins are usually said to be “sweeter,” as a white wine drinker looking for red wines, it’s probably best to avoid reds aged in oak, especially at first.

Fruit

Both white wines and red wines can claim to be fruity, but the reality is that a fruity white and a fruity red are different. If you think about a fruity white wine you love, chances are it has flavors of apple, lemon, peach, citrus or pear. Fruity reds, on the other hand, have flavors of cherry, raspberry, blueberry, plum and blackberry.

If you find a red with prominent fruit flavors, you’re more likely to enjoy it as a white wine drinker.

But the differences in fruit flavors don’t make red wines a lost cause. In fact, if you find a red with prominent fruit flavors, you’re more likely to enjoy it as a white wine drinker. Opt for fruity reds over those that boast earthiness, which can be a white wine drinker’s worst nightmare: dry and harsh.

Temperature

Another factor that isn’t a staple part of the wine but is important for white wine drinkers is the temperature of the glass of wine. Imagine yourself sitting outside on a warm day, sipping on a glass of your favorite white wine. Chances are in this daydream, you’re sipping on a chilled glass of white wine. The reason whites are almost always served cooler than glasses of red is that warmer temperatures make the tannins more prominent. As a white wine drinker, while you may enjoy the refreshing nature of a chilled glass of white, the less prominent tannins are another reason you enjoy a cool glass of wine.

Wine enthusiasts' opinions differ slightly, but the consensus is that white wines should be served somewhere around 40-50 degrees, and red should be served somewhere around 60-65 degrees.

Wine enthusiasts’ opinions differ slightly, but the consensus is that white wines should be served somewhere around 40-50 degrees, and red should be served somewhere around 60-65 degrees. It’s possible to overchill your glass of wine, which can mute the flavors. If you’re searching for the best red wine for white wine drinkers, consider tasting your glass of red at the same temperature you’d enjoy a white. The subtle difference, combined with a red wine that has a lighter-body, low-tannins and fruity flavor, may be exactly what you need to begin embracing red wines.

Shop for White and Red Wines Online

Whether we’ve convinced you, as a white wine drinker, to take a risk and give red wines a try — or not — Marketview Liquor has a wide selection of both red wines and white wines. All of these wines are easy to order online by the bottle or by the case and have shipped anywhere in the United States. The best part is you can mix and match a customized case of select wine that includes a few of your favorite white wines and a few of the reds we’ve mentioned. We have an extensive online selection, and we’re sure you’ll find the wine you want, in a price range you can afford to pay.

Choose from wines that originate along California’s Coast, in a valley of the Alps, on the rolling hills of Spain, or the south of France. Whether you’re searching for a high-end bottle to give as a gift, or a case of affordable favorites to stock your pantry, our selection includes them all.

Choose from wines that originate along California’s Coast, in a valley of the Alps, on the rolling hills of Spain, or the south of France.

Get started by searching for your new red wine match — or your tried-and-true white wine favorite on our website.